Volunteer Seabird Monitors Share Stories

“I had the opportunity to share my binoculars with about eight people looking at the seals on the bluff above Jenner. What they hadn’t seen was there were two bald eagles next to the surf and about 15 or 16 different cormorants fishing right in the mouth. As we were watching the eagles a whale calf and mom appeared, and the calf put on a show for us. Suddenly there were questions from people who had been only able to see the seals before and were excited by all the life they got to see. It is a wonderful feeling to be able to expand a visitor’s individual’s experience. I handed out brochures, talked about Stewards, and in general had a wonderful time.” -Jan deWald, May 28

Volunteers monitor Bodega Rock, S. Tezak

Volunteers monitor Bodega Rock, S. Tezak

Brook and I had a pretty exciting morning at Gull Rock. Our opening scene was that of a Peregrine Falcon tearing after two big, scared, and surely surprised Canada Geese. After the geese were routed out to sea, the falcon came back and sat on the bluff edge, about 20 feet from us and screamed at us for several minutes. Being quite a bit bigger than the falcon, Brook and I bravely stood our ground, and the falcon eventually flew off. About 15 minutes later we saw the falcon and its mate chasing away an osprey. Later still, one of the pair was going after two Western Gulls. Meanwhile there was quite a bit of agitation on Gull Rock, with about 30 birds, mostly murres, flying off the rock and taking five or ten minutes to settle down. Eventually they did return to the rock as the falcons flew back towards the hills behind us.” – Bonnie Wilson, May 8

Gleason Beach Monitoring Site

Gleason Beach Monitoring Site

“Last year knowing about the Black Oystercatcher nest and chicks at Bodega Head (thanks to daily communication about their progress from various people in the program) provided me with the knowledge to bring friends to witness this beautiful sight. It was the first time they looked through a spotting scope. I remember fondly this incredible experience and enjoy sharing it with others.” – Diane Barth

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